Health Alerts - Choose Wisely - True Facts and Fallacies
You should always take care with Exercise
Some Fitness Programs leave you anything but fit.
Remember this rule: to exercise to the point of exhilaration is fine
but do not exercise to the point of exertion -
because it places strain on body parts and produces excess Cortisol.
A stress hormone that results in more weight, NOT less weight.


Be careful of the perils of Gym equipment
that is too strenuous and some are unnatural and
damaging to your body.


8 Exercise Machines You Should Stop Using Immediately


WE HAVE ONE BODY FOR LIFE!


Chest Fly Machine
What it does, however, is place excessive stress on your shoulders and the connecting tissues.
Seated Shoulder Press
This machine actually works against your shoulders, forcing them into unsafe positions they weren't made to be in.
Instead, try some medicine ball throws or lateral dumbbell raises.
Roman Chair Sit-ups. You probably think that a wider range of motion would help you develop those killer abs you've been wanting, but the truth is that this exercise has the potential to damage your spine.
Roman Chair Sit-ups Stick to planks instead.
Hip Abduction Machine Also called the outer thigh machine, this machine works in conjunction with the hip adduction machine.
Its main use is to develop the muscles of your outer thigh by pushing a heavy weight away with your thigh while sitting.
Seated Leg Extension This machine aims to train your quadriceps, but it's just not a very functional machine overall. It also puts unnecessary stress on your knees.
Seated Leg Extension Instead of just targeting one type of muscle, why not target many at once? Do lunges with dumbbells to get all the leg muscles moving.
Seated Ab Rotation Your spine is begging you to stop using this machine. Think about it, your hips are stationary and your shoulders twist.
A great exercise for the obliques is the cable wood chop or bicycle crunches.
The Smith Machine The Smith Machine, when used for upright rows, can compress the nerves of your shoulder and forces your body into an unnatural motion.
Never underestimate the power of traditional squats.




14 Walking Workouts To Burn Fat And Boost Energy

Reader-tested routines that sculpt toned muscles and target stubborn fat

Flip Your Fat-Burning Switch!

You could shrink a size (or more) this month by adding high-intensity walks to your routine. You’ll burn more fat during and after your cardio workouts. And there are options to fit everyone’s needs—a 10-minute routine for busy days and an indoor option for rainy weather. For best results, do at least 20 minutes of high-intensity walking (any combo of the workouts in this section or any of the hill or stair routines in the following sections—the longer walks will slim you down faster) on 3 non-consecutive days a week. On alternate days, do moderate-intensity activity for about 30 minutes per session.

Choose your walking program
The following walking workouts will help you sculpt your fittest, slimmest body yet!
Whether you want to burn fat, boost energy, lift mood, or just be a bit more toned in a few important places, we have the workouts for you. They’ve all been road tested by Prevention readers and are ready to deliver fast results. Pick your goal and discover new, fun ways to achieve it. Michele Stanten, author of Walk Off Weight, designed several of these workouts.

We’ve organized the tips and walking workouts by specific goals. Choose the one that’s right for you, and start working toward your fittest body ever!
Download the free printable PDF for a portable guide.
Pair your walking workout with delicious recipes found in the New Deluxe Edition of The Sugar Smart Diet.

Flip Your Fat-Burning Switch!
You could shrink a size (or more) this month by adding high-intensity walks to your routine. You’ll burn more fat during and after your cardio workouts. And there are options to fit everyone’s needs—a 10-minute routine for busy days and an indoor option for rainy weather. For best results, do at least 20 minutes of high-intensity walking (any combo of the workouts in this section or any of the hill or stair routines in the following sections—the longer walks will slim you down faster) on 3 non-consecutive days a week. On alternate days, do moderate-intensity activity for about 30 minutes per session.

Walking Workout: Treadmill Slimmer
Time: 30 minutes
Treadmills are the perfect excuse buster—no need to worry about weather, traffic, or darkness. Seeing your speed increase as you become more fit is also a huge motivator. Try this routine from Lee Scott, creator of the DVD Simple Steps for a Great Walking Workout, to blast more than 150 calories* in half an hour.

Walking Workout: Happiness Walk
Time: 10+ minutes
Revitalize your mind and body with an easy walk that includes these stress-busting techniques from Carolyn Scott Kortge, author of Healing Walks for Hard Times. The longer you walk, the more benefits you'll see. Says Preventionreader Lisa DiMarzio of Ware, MA: "When I tried it after a tense meeting, I felt calm almost immediately instead of reliving the event that made me stressed."

Step 1: Focus on your feet. Feel the firm ground beneath you as each foot rolls from heel to toe. Try to hold awareness of your steps for 2 to 3 minutes.
Step 2: Turn your attention to breathing. Lift your torso to stand upright and increase lung space. As you inhale, imagine you are drawing in renewed energy. Exhale tiredness and pain. Let fresh life flow into your lungs and your cells.
Step 3: Mentally talk to yourself. Thinking Fresh air in, stale air out as you breathe can help you maintain focus.

Walking Workout: Brainpower Booster
Time: Under 20 minutes
Changing the direction you walk—forward, backward, or sideways—keeps your mind alert, turns up your calorie burn, and activates some often-underused muscles, such as your outer and inner thighs. This routine is best done on a school track (most are ¼-mile around).

The workout: 
Lap 1: Start at the beginning of the curved part of the track. Walk as you normally would to warm up for a full lap.
Lap 2: Turn sideways so right foot is in front. Sidestep or shuffle around the curved part of the track. Walk backward on the straight section. Sidestep through the next curve with left foot in front. Walk forward on the straight section.
Lap 3: Repeat lap 2, walking sideways, backward, sideways, and forward.
Lap 4: Walk forward, slowing your pace to cool down. This is a 1-mile walk if you use a ¼-mile track. You can do more laps to extend it or work up to doing half or even full laps of each type of walking.

Walking Workout: Head For The Trees
Time: 5+ minutes
A dose of nature can boost your mood and energize you in just 5 minutes. If you exercise in a natural setting and go longer (a lunchtime stroll in a park or an all-day hike in the mountains), you can improve your memory and attention 20% more than you can by walking in an urban environment. That’s because there are fewer distractions and it’s more relaxing. To find off-road walking routes in your area, go to trails.com.

http://www.prevention.com/fitness/fitness-tips/14-walking-workouts-burn-fat-and-boost-energy/flip-your-fat-burning-switch


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Work Your Body For Health - Exercise!
John Bergman a Doctor of Chiropractor teaches you how to have safe exercise and work-outs. He will also show you how to avoid pitfalls and engage in Restorative Exercise for ailments.


6 Training Hacks for Bad Knees

By  Lee Boyce

“Bad knees” is an easy crutch many lean on when explaining why they don’t squat, jog, lunge, or basically do anything else that’s leg-related. In truth, it shouldn’t stop anyone from performing lower body movements. If you have knee pain when you workout, follow these steps to successfully rehab the joint.
Strengthen the posterior chain.
The hamstrings and glutes play a huge role in alleviating knee stress. Performing exercises for the posterior muscles, like deadlifts and kettlebell swings, will help bolster the knees and reduce or prevent pain.
Use a full range of motion.
Half-squats and partial lunges may actually make matters worse. A full range of motion allows the joint to be properly exercised and the corresponding muscles to contribute evenly. Partial ranges can overload the quads, which are a common culprit of overuse, especially where knee stress is concerned. Worse yet, getting strong in a small range of motion simply exposes a more stilted and blatant imbalance as soon as you pass out of these small ranges. That could mean further injury.
Take care of your hips.
The knee joint is beholden to the hips. So if the hip joint is in poor condition, the knees will be too. The hip musculature is usually tight and weak, with poor mobility due to desk jobs and general underuse. To restore mobility to the hip structure, make a habit of performing cradle walksspiderman walks, and high knee walks on a regular basis — especially before you train.
Change your cardio.
Running, cycling, and rowing may feel pain-free when you do them, but they’re contributing to the muscle imbalances that result in the joint pain you experience day to day. All of these exercises involve repetitive actions that only jack up the quads and hip flexors or cause impact to the same joints (the knee and hip). The small range of motion the knee joint travels through while cycling and running lends to the point mentioned above in worsening an already present muscle imbalance. And sitting on a seat to perform rows immediately shuts down the posterior chain from being involved in the movement. To replace these, try lowering your rest interval between sets of a strength workout to keep your heart rate. Or, go for a swim. Swimming is impact-free, and works the whole body.
Keep a vertical shin position.
As much as possible, keep a vertical shin during moves like squats and lunges. The further forward your knees pass over your toes, the more quad-dominant a lift is going to be. In an ideal world, a knee shifting forward over the toes is fine, as long as the entire feet are planted firmly on the ground. However, in the case of chronic pain, it could cause aggravation. Using reverse lunges, deadlifts, and box squats as the hub of your lower body training can instill a very vertical shin position and target the quads, hamstrings, and glutes without aggravation.
Avoid isolation
Movements that isolate one muscle group at a time (think hamstring curls, leg extensions) can cause shearing forces that can damage the knee joint. Focus your workouts on compound movements like squats and deadlifts that allow all the muscles surrounding the joint to contract and stabilizing the joint.


Mistakes That Can Cause Back Pain

Christine Skopec  

Bad form in the weight room

Sorry gym goers, but the lifts you do during your workouts could be the very reason why your back is always aching. Sadly, some exercises that are supposed to alleviate back pain can make it worse when performed incorrectly. One of the main culprits is the deadlift. Done correctly, this move can help strengthen the muscles around the base of your spine, but many guys unwittingly round their backs when they lean down to grasp the bar.
According to StrongLifts, maintaining a neutral position as you lift the bar is the safest way to go. This means you also want to avoid an exaggerated arch, which can lead to injury. And don’t forget about form when you bring the bar back to the ground.
Deadlifts aren’t alone in their potential to cause back injury. Livestrong shared a whole list of exercises that can be problematic if you aren’t careful. Gyms are lined with mirrors for a reason, so monitor yourself as you perform a lift. If you’re in doubt, enlist a gym buddy to keep an eye on you as you go through the motions.


PLEASE BE CAREFUL!

Many Gym instructors train you to do certain exercises that
Physiotherapists and Chiropractors advise strongly against.