Health Alerts - Choose Wisely - True Facts and Fallacies

Here, we will look at Foods with Detergent in them
and how Toxic the Residue of Dish Detergent is
on our glasses and plates if we do not rinse them!


  


Why Creamy Peanut Butter Is Fattening…It’s Not The Fat
 
Would you want to eat “soapy” food? Well, you might be doing that if you eat peanut butter, ice cream, sherbet, mayonnaise, salad dressing, icing, pudding, candy, cottage cheese or cream cheese.
Depending on how they are manufactured, each of these foods may contain actual detergent.
It’s in many everyday foods, and besides being disgusting to think about eating, it could be setting the stage for digestive ills, cardiovascular troubles and weight gain.
 
MESSING WITH OUR GUT
 
There’s growing evidence that certain particular ingredients in many processed foods may interfere with digestion, setting the stage for digestive illnesses, cardiovascular risk andweight gain. They’re called emulsifiers — a kind of detergent that’s added to improve texture and extend shelf life.

When food manufacturers remove fat from foods, they often add emulsifiers to create a smoother product.

The latest evidence: Two of the most common emulsifiers in our food supply— carboymethylcellulose and polysorbate-80—can alter beneficial gut bacteria in nasty ways. 
We already reported on an earlier study that found that these compounds change the mucous membrane of the gut so that healthy bacteria leak out, triggering inflammation. This inflammation starts a chain reaction that could lead to diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and inflammatory bowel disease—as well as metabolic syndrome, which can lead to diabetes and heart disease.
Now in a new study, the same researchers at Georgia State University have found that the damage begins even before bacteria leak out of the gut. Using lab equipment that simulates the human gut, researchers added the two emulsifiers to the human gut bacteria. Markers for inflammation increased significantly.
The researchers then implanted the altered gut bacteria into gut-bacteria–free mice. Result: The mice developed intestinal inflammation and showed signs of metabolic syndrome.
 
WHAT TO DO NOW
 
It’s still early research, to be sure—human studies are planned—and there’s no way to know yet how important a role these ingredients actually play in these common diseases.
It’s not known whether other emulsifiers have similar negative effects. However, carrageenan, a gum that is also commonly used as an emulsifier, has been linked in other animal studies to gut inflammation.
But the research is enough to make us read labels pretty carefully—at least for a start. For instance, these two additives, which are labeled as safe for food by the FDA, go by a variety of names…
  • Carboxymethylcellulose is also known as cellulose gum, carboxymethyl cellulose, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, CMC, modified cellulose and cellulose gel.
  • Polysorbate 80 is also known as polyoxythylene sorbitan mono-oleate and Tween 80.
However, even careful label reading can only take you so far, since possible gut-harming emulsifiers lurk in many processed foods. The easiest way to play it safe? Choose minimally processed foods that contain only ingredients you recognize. You can find ice cream that contains just cream, milk and sugar, for example. And when it comes to peanut butter, whether smooth or crunchy, look for those that contain just peanuts, or peanuts and salt.
 
From aStudy of effects of carboxymethylcellulose and polysorbate-80 on human gut bacteria by Benoit Chassaing, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical sciences, and colleagues, Georgia State University, Atlanta, presented at 2016 Digestive Disease Week in San Diego.
 
Source:  Benoit Chassaing, PhD, Georgia State University

So we have the Cholesterol Scare Campaign and the Low-Fat, No-Fat Craze to thank for this added toxicity in some foods we buy, in addition to the imbalances they have encouraged in our diets. It's not enough, these Food Giants put heaps of sugar and salt in our food products; soy; msg and aspartame; poly trans-fats and other chemicals.......now we hear that we are ingesting detergent (emulsifiers) as
well if we continue to buy their products!

THE FOLLOWING LINK WILL LEAD YOU TO ETHICAL PRODUCTS FROM COMPANIES
WHO PRACTICE RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT IN MANUFACTURING FOOD PRACTICES. HERE

I LIKE THIS WEBSITE TOO. IT LETS YOU KNOW DIFFERENT WAYS YOU CAN AVOID NASTY CHEMICALS
AND SIMPLE HOMEMADE MEASURES YOU CAN TAKE IN THE KITCHEN AND OTHER ROOMS. HERE


FOR YOUR INTEREST, I FOUND THE FOLLOWING COMMENTS ON DIFFERENT FORUMS!


I cannot understand the habit of washing and rinsing dishes in the same dirty water, and drying them without washing off the soap suds.
 
I have also observed this behavior, presumably due to frugality with hot water. It doesn't seem to do them much harm (see queries on eczema) but I hope they're using Ecover Liquid at least and ingesting fewer nasty petrochemicals!
Where is the common sense in not rinsing the dishes? I have only just graduated pharmacy then and one of the subject was toxicology...trust me, there is nothing healthy in washing up liquid.
 
Yes it is important to rinse Dishes. Here is why: Firstly, Dishwashing liquid contains some fairly toxic chemicals. Secondly, by not rinsing off the Chemical residue, this residue will be absorbed by the body and over time can cause health problems. This is known as the Bio accumulative effect. Our bodies were not designed to be bombarded with Chemicals.
 
Many of our friends wash dishes in soapy water and then put the dishes on the draining board without rinsing in water. I can't understand how this can be considered hygienic, yet our friends who do this are generally educated, well-off and otherwise clean-living.
 
I wouldn't follow their hygiene practices.
Yes because your learned opinion is obviously much more valuable.
I would rather rinse because I think it's cleaner.
 
He said it was due to the presence of Triclosan. In the soap? YES!
 
I rinse because I don't like the smell of the detergent on my plates.

DISHWASHERS ARE'NT ALWAYS THE ANSWER, BUT IF YOU CONSIDER ONE, PLEASE READ
The PDF's that will give you good advice you need to know, so you can Avoid Toxic Chemicals on your dishes!


DISHWASHER: I've heard tell of people having great results with KD Gold in the dishwasher, but it just doesn't work with my water. So, I've found a great nontoxic powdered dishwasher detergent. I put KD Gold in the open cup and a tablespoon of OXY-DISH Automatic Dishwasher Detergent, a non-toxic product from Natural Choices Home Safe Products, in the closed cup, with great results. There's no smell during the wash cycle. The dishes come out sparkling with no residue or chemical taste. And it's environmentally friendly with no phosphates or chlorine.  (By the way, chlorine bleach in your dishwasher soap is the reason you can't put dishes with tomato or milk on them in without rinsing first.  The combination of the chlorine and tomato or milk make a toxic gas.  DON'T USE CHLORINE BLEACH - especially on your dishes).
 



Is there any harm in not rinsing dish soap off when washing up?

I notice people in the British Isles have a method which consists in (1) filling basin with soapy water (2) wiping dish with soapy water (3) removing dish to dry.  Is that actually OK?  My typically American reaction is "Eww..."
 
I saw a Canadian doing this after I'd had dinner with him. I found it disturbing.
I'm a big fan of thorough rinsing, and in fact find the "one sink soapy, one sink rinse water" technique gross as well.
I have noticed when drinking water out of some glasses that I detect a soapy perfume, which I find off-putting.

What Are the Dangers of Detergent on Food?

 
Food can be tainted by a number of different things in the kitchen, one of which is detergent. Detergents can cause a number negative effects if ingested. Detergent on food can affect people of different ages in different ways.
 
Poisoning
  • According to Mamashealth.com, dishwasher detergents are the number one cause of household poisoning. Both liquid and powder detergents can sometimes remain on dishes and end up on plates that serve food. This detergent can then be absorbed into food served on the plates or dishes, poisoning the people who eat it. This occurs even more quickly if the food served on the dish is hot, which allows the detergent to absorb into the food even more quickly. Dishes taken from the dishwasher should be inspected for residual detergent, and washed off and dried again if necessary.
Accumulation Side Effects
  • In small doses, detergents can slowly poison your body over time, but so slowly that you may not notice it initially. The chlorine from many of these detergents can accumulate in your body, slowing liver function and causing the skin and eyes to begin to yellow. Freckles may begin to occur more on the skin and the body may absorb ingested metals more easily like cadmium, for example, which will ultimately cause blood poisoning if present in the body in large amounts. It takes a number of years of constant ingestion to create these serious effects, but any amount of poisoning is not healthy.
 
www.organicauthority.com/.../10-best-products-for-cleaning-dishes-naturally.html
Apr 18, 2013 - These dishwasher detergent packs make cleaning dishes easy—